From the NAI Archive – June 2, 2015 – A Tale of Two Trios – Dissecting the Success of the Shield and the Failure of the (Wyatt) Family

From the NAI Archive – June 2, 2015 – A Tale of Two Trios – Dissecting the Success of the Shield and the Failure of the (Wyatt) Family

It is a well-known fact that DC Matthews, and really the NAIborhood in general, loves the concept of a stable. Travel back through the Twitter and article histories and you’ll see countless discussions about who should team with who, what the angle should be, etc.

Over the last few years, the concept of a “stable” has shifted. Gone are the days of the Horsemen and the nWo. In today’s WWE, you’ve got two types of stables.

The Authority: A group of individuals focused solely on the protection of their star, with some occasional dips into promoting their own “best for business” agenda.
A trio: 3 guys uniting for a single cause. Not 4. 5 is right out. It has to be 3.

While there have been many famous triads in wrestling history (New Day is, hopefully, turning some curious fans onto the success of the Fabulous Freebirds), this recent trend can be traced back to two major groups – The Shield and The Wyatt Family. These two trios had countless battles, mainly against each other, and seemed to dominate pro wrestling for a brief period.

Yet, looking back on it, this is a tale of two trios. While The Shield is lauded, praised and seems destined for Hall of Fame greatness, the Wyatts are mainly an example of “what might have been.” Why is that? Why did one trio succeed while the other faltered, when both seemed poised to take over the world? As with any good question, there’s multiple answers here, so let’s take a look back and see what happened.

From the NAI Archive – April 22, 2015 – What if Wednesday – What if the former Shield brothers had new finishing moves?

From the NAI Archive – April 22, 2015 – What if Wednesday – What if the former Shield brothers had new finishing moves?

I hope this column finds you mostly recovered from the egregious and tragic news of the week. Yes, friends, Seth Rollins debuted a new finisher on RAW. I could hear you all weeping and gnashing your teeth from the comfort of my bed, mourning the loss of the Curb Stomp.

While “The Architect” has only been a main event player for a brief period, his finishing move sure worked its way into our hearts, didn’t it? That’s the beauty of the truly good ‘match-enders’ – the Superkick, the Sharpshooter, the GTS – sometimes they expand beyond the talents themselves.

The perfect finisher is more than just a flashy move; it’s truly a combination of the right maneuver done by the right superstar, usually to the right opponent. Now, I’m not going to talk much about the Stone Cold Stunner in this column, and if you’ve read my recent work you know why – I take issue with Austin taking issue with someone using his move, so he and I are in a fight right now.